Srpski jezik za strance

Guca FestivalThis festival has recently become a very popular tourist attraction, mostly among students. You may learn how to do the traditional kolo dance or try belly-dancing on the table. You might not remember doing it, but your friends will gladly remind you by putting it on YouTube.

If you want to listen one song to have an idea about this music, and get more info about festival

click here Guča madness

The Guča trumpet festival, also known as the Dragačevo Assembly (Serbian: Драгачевски сабор or Dragačevski sabor), is an annual brass band festival held in the town of Guča, near the city of Čačak , in the Dragačevo region of western Serbia. Guča is a three-hour bus journey from Belgrade.

600,000 visitors make their way to the town of 2,000 people every year, both from Serbia and abroad. Elimination heats earlier in the year mean only a few dozen bands get to compete. Guča’s official festival is split into three parts. Friday’s opening concert, Saturday night celebrations and Sunday’s competition. Friday’s concerts are held at the entrance to the official Guča Festival building. This event features previous winners, each band getting to play three tunes while folk dancers, all kitted out in bright knitting patterns, dance kolos and oros in front of a hyped-up audience.

An English party site, ThisIsTheLife.com, has named Guča the best festival in the world.

Forget GlastonburyReadingBurning Man and Coachella: the wildest music festival on earth is a cacophonic and crazy brass band festival that takes place every summer in the tiny Serbian town of Guča in the western region of Dragačevo.

Said Miles Davis, a Guča Festival visitor:

I didn’t know you could play trumpet that way

This festival has recently become a very popular tourist attraction, mostly among students. They first got acquainted with Emir Kusturica’s films, consequently with Goran Bregović’s music (and Boban Marković’s band) and then they find out about the festival, and come, eager to see this exotica and indulge in a five-day drinking binge. The majority comes from ex-Yugoslav republics, but many are from countries where the trumpet doesn’t play such a prominent part in their national music – namely France, Australia, Spain, Canada, Britain and Germany. Among five hundred thousand Guča spectators August 6 – 10, 2008 there were about thirty thousand foreigners.

The Guča Trumpet festivalSo, what is in there for you? If you are a vegetarian, or a teetotaller, or if you obsess over cleanliness, you are very likely to be disgusted – let’s just say that 750 000 litres of beer has been drunk, 600 roasted pigs and 700 lambs eaten and each vendor has sold approximately 5,000 pieces of grilled meat. As for the rubbish, you can expect to step on many beer tins, and the total is 600 tones of rubbish for five days. People drink (mostly beer and local brandy) and drive. If it is any consolation, they have practiced it before. They are more of a nuisance when they are on foot, making fools of themselves, shouting or singing or both. I read somewhere that the louder the music, the more people drink. It was a recent experiment in France and it proved that with louder music, we drink faster and order more. The researchers said that it is either due to increased ‘arousal’ by the music or the fact that friends can’t hear themselves over the music, so they drink instead of talking. It makes perfect sense, in Guča at least. Back to food, for vegetarians, there is cabbage, cooked in huge earthen pots. (Meat chops are put in it during the cooking process, but you are free to take them out.)
I would like to mention Boban Marković again, a Serbian trumpet player and a brass band leader who has received world acclaim and won numerous awards, the last one being put among the greatest musicians in the UK’s Songline magazine. He has won the Guča Festival many times in a row and has decided to withdraw, leaving his son, whom he believes to be even a better player than himself, in charge. Marko Marković has broaden and modernized songs by adding everything the audience knows and appreciates – from jazz to Beethoven. They tour Europe and America and have recently been to Germany, France and Scandinavian countries.

In 2010 organisators plan to make a world trumpet competition in Guča. Some would not miss it for the world. Some prefer Exit. You know, the festival in Novi Sad, with completely different music but the same happpy-go-lucky atmosphere. The choice is all yours.

Comments are closed.